21 Foot Rule – Why Conceal-Carry Can Be a False Sense of Security

21 Foot Rule – Why Conceal-Carry Can Be a False Sense of Security

The 21 Foot Rule is something that we have studied extensively in Krav-Maga. This rule says that if an attacker with an edged weapon is within twenty-one feet of you, that you will not have time to draw your firearm before they can stab you. We have simulated this thousands of times when training in Krav-Maga. Every instance that we have an attacker within 21 feet or less of the person with a holstered weapon – the attacker can reach and stab the person before they can draw their firearm and get it on target.

On the other hand, it seems that those with a concealed-handgun license have never heard of it, much less studied it. And that my friends is a very dangerous situation. Moreover, the lack of understanding the 21 Foot Rule can create a false-sense of security for those with a concealed-handgun license when facing an attacker with an edged weapon. Particularly when the attacker with the edged weapon, typically a knife, or machete is within a 21 foot radius of them.

Here is the background on how the rule was formulated and the timing involved courtesy of www.policeone.com

The 21-Foot Rule was formulated by timing subjects beginning their headlong run from a dead stop on a flat surface offering good traction and officers standing stationary on the same plane, sidearm holstered and snapped in. The FSRC has extensively measured action and reaction times under these same conditions. Among other things, the Center has documented the time it takes officers to make 20 different actions that are common in deadly force encounters. Here are some of the relevant findings that the FSRC applied in reevaluating the 21-Foot Rule.

Once he perceives a signal to do so, the AVERAGE officer requires 1.5 seconds to draw from a snapped Level II holster and fire one unsighted round at center mass. Meanwhile, the AVERAGE suspect with an edged weapon raised in the traditional “ice-pick” position can go from a dead stop to level, unobstructed surface offering good traction in 1.5-1.7 seconds.

The above doesn’t even account for the time it takes the person with the gun to realize or visualize the attacker which even if milliseconds gives the advantage even more so to the attacker. This is the essence of the 21 Foot Rule.

The burden of proof is overwhelming that those carrying a concealed handgun are in a definite if not fatal disadvantage against an attacker with an edged-weapon if they are within 21 feet of them.

The moral of the story here is not to be lulled into a false-sense of security that if you are carrying a concealed handgun that you have the upper-hand against an attacker with an edged-weapon – at least if they are within 21 feet of you and you haven’t drawn your weapon.

Cary Michael Cox

Krav Maga – My Journey, The Begining

Krav Maga – My Journey, The Begining

Krav Maga is the best self-defense system on the planet in my opinion. There is a reason most top Special Operation Groups use it. These include Navy Seals, Delta Force, SAS, and Shayetet 13 the Israeli equivalent of the US Navy Seals. In fact, Krav Maga is taught to every member of the Israeli Defense Force. Moreover, this combat system has been adopted by many of the top law enforcement agencies nationwide. If all of these “Teams” find it to be the best I’d say that my opinion is valid. Moreover, there is no self-defense system that has been more “Battle-Tested” than Krav Maga. That makes it a proven system that works.

Like many young boys I always had an interest in martial arts. Perhaps it was all of the Bruce Lee, Chuck Norris, and later Jackie Chan movies I had watched. Finally, after college I took the plunge and contacted many martial arts schools. The one I settled on at the time was Champions Martial Arts. It was a school that taught multiple systems as one. I practiced there for years obtaining a black-belt in Shin-Nagare Karate and Wu-Shu Kung-Fu.

There were lost of positive things I learned there. The four that you should learn at any quality martial arts school: Respect, Discipline, Patience, & Determination. It also provided me a place to set goals and obtain them through hard work. The most practical martial art I was introduced to there was Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu. I had a solid foundation on ground-fighting. I also developed many friendships many of which I still enjoy today. Eventually the Head Instructor retired, and it was time to find a new martial arts school to train & practice.

About that time I heard about an Israeli Martial Art system called, Krav-Maga while watching a television program. What piqued my interest was the instructor talking about using “anything” as a weapon and the practicality of the system. It was simple, effective, and anyone could learn it. That was all I had to hear, now I had to find a place to checkout this martial art. And I’ll continue the story in my next post. Until then, “Walk In Peace”.

Cary Michael Cox